The U.S. Army Swears in Two Catholic Chaplain Candidates

Seminarians from the Archdiocese of Washington take the oath for eventual service to those who serve

Father Jason Hesseling (left) swears in William Morrison (center) and Mark Dwyer (right) as U.S. Army Chaplain Candidates on Monday, August 3, 2015, in Washington, D.C.

Father Jason Hesseling (left) swears in William Morrison (center) and Mark Dwyer (right) as U.S. Army Chaplain Candidates on Monday, August 3, 2015, in Washington, D.C.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Two Catholic seminarians from theArchdiocese of Washington were sworn in this week as U.S. Army Chaplain Candidates. Mr. Mark Dwyer and Mr. William Morrison, both seminarians at John Paul II Seminary, took the oath on Monday, August 3, at the Edwin Cardinal O’Brien Pastoral Center, headquarters of the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA(AMS).

The Army’s Catholic Chaplain Recruiter, Father Jason Hesseling, administered the oath at the 10:00 a.m. ceremony. His Excellency, the Most Reverend Timothy P. Broglio, J.C.D., Archbishop for the Military Services, attended the ceremony. Also in attendance were the AMSVicar General, Monsignor John J.M. Foster, J.C.D.; the AMS Vocations Director, Father Aidan Logan, O.C.S.O.; the AMS Chancellor, Deacon Michael Yakir; and a gathering of AMS staffers.

As Chaplain Candidates, Mr. Dwyer and Mr. Morrison will be eligible, upon ordination, to go on active duty after three years of pastoral work in the Archdiocese of Washington. The Army is in great need of their services. Like the Navy and the Air Force, it continues to suffer a chronic shortage of Catholic Chaplains as more and more priests reach the military’s mandatory retirement age of 62 faster than they can be replaced.

Approximately 100 Catholic priests currently serve in the Army on active duty, representing only about one priest for every 1,200 Catholic Soldiers, not counting their families.

Young men interested in discerning a priestly vocation, and the vocation within a vocation to serve those who serve in the U.S. military, can find more information at www.milarch.org/vocations, or may contact Father Aidan Logan by email.

The AMS receives no funding from the government and depends entirely on private giving to support its vocations program and pastoral services to those who serve. Donations can be made here.